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The Lowe's Marathon

As I mentioned in the last post, I spend a lot of time at Lowe's and Home Depot looking for supplies. This remodel is no exception. I started with a preliminary trip to Lowe's just to make a list of stuff I need and to get prices on everything from doors to light fixtures. This preliminary trip lasted about two hours. Keep in mind, I didn't buy a thing. Lowe's probably had about 80% of what I needed but some of the items were pretty expensive. A friend of mine told me to check out Habitat for Humanity's Restore. I went there hoping to find some unique items at bargain prices. For the most part, I was disappointed. Most of the stuff there is crammed onto the shelves dirty and incomplete. To find anything that will work for your particular need is really difficult and most of their prices are more than new materials. But if you look really hard, you can find some great bargains. In my case, I found a nice French door that would go from the garage to the yard replacing a hideous beaten up wood door. I also found some interior doors that would be replacements for the ones that looked like Mike Tyson and OJ Simpson had a run at them. These doors were dirt cheap but, all in all, I don't think it was worth the time it took to find them. Ok, so I spent about 4 hours just scouting for materials. Once I had my comprehensive list, I went back to Lowe's and spent another 5 hours buying the stuff. FYI, I really do prefer Lowe's to Home Depot. More organized, cleaner, better service, not as busy, etc. I spent over $1000 on tile, doors, hardware, light fixtures, plumbing fixtures, lawn stuff and much more. It was exhausting. The worst part was probably spending my Friday night unloading all the stuff in the house. Five hundred feet of tile is heavy! Shopping for and getting the materials probably took me a week. Honestly, it could be done in a day but I procrastinated because I really hate shopping. Next, actual work begins...

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